Author: vanhoesenj

Join Us For the 2017 VAAS Fellows Luncheon

Venue:
The WINDJAMMER Restaurant, 1076 Williston Road, South Burlington VT 05403.  Saturday, October 21, 2017 at 12:00pm.  (802) 862-6585

2016 Fellows Luncheon

The Academy will celebrate the induction of five 2017 Fellows on Saturday October 21, 2017: Major Jackson (Poet and Teacher), Brooke T. Mossman (Professor of Pathology), Jay Parini (Poet, Author and Teacher), Alison Bechdel (Cartoonist and Author of Graphic Novels) and Geraldine deBatlle (Teacher). Please join us. New Fellows are free. Guests welcome!

To join us, please fill out this form and make checks payable to VAAS (Vermont Academy of Arts & Sciences). DEADLINE for luncheon reservations is Friday Sept. 9, 2016.  Mail checks to: Connell Gallagher, P.O. Box 240, Underhill, VT 05489. Phone: (802) 899-3034  email:  cbgallag@uvm.edu If you wish to pay with a credit card, contact Christina Chant cchant@smcvt.edu

French Connections Conference 2017 – UVM

French Connections : Franconnexions Conference

March 20th, 2017, International Francophonie Day

University of Vermont, Burlington

A conference highlighting the historical, cultural and economic contributions of French Canadians from Québec into Vermont and New England.

ABOUT

Between 1830 and 1930, close to one million immigrants from Québec poured into Vermont and New England, populating towns and villages, starting new businesses and farms. While many of these new immigrants settled closer to the border, others spread throughout Vermont and into New England. The influence of these new settlers on the state and region was vast, from politics to culture, to the economy. In many northern schools in Vermont, French was as frequently spoken as English. Today, while the phone book remains heavily dominated by French surnames, this huge influx of population is largely integrated. Yet some 25% of Vermonters trace their ancestry to French Canada.

In this conference we look at the past, the present and the future of these cross-border migrations and relationships. In three panels we examine this story, asking these fundamental questions:

  • Past: How and why was Vermont and New England populated by so many French Canadians in the 19th-early twentieth centuries? When, how and why did this massive influx assimilate?
  • Present: How do cross-border connections with Québec, in tourism and in trade, continue to shape the culture and economy of Northern New England?
  • Future: How does the French Canadian wave of immigration relate to current immigration trends?  What can we learn from the past as we think about the future?

To learn more about the conference click here.
To register for the conference click here.

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